Other recovery items

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Britzen Roen 1 week, 6 days ago.

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  • #199731

    Patrick Tingley
    Participant
    Basic Member

    I thought this would be a good place to start a list of items for recovery besides a winch and straps. Depending on your location your recovery items will vary. Obviously you won’t need an axe in the sand dunes… But nonetheless…. I want everyone to contribute what they use if it is not on the list.

    Some items I have used and still carry:

    Axe or hatchet or both

    Maxtrax or similar items

    A scissor or bottle jack or a floor jack with a skid (some companies make skid plates so you can use a floor jack in sand, snow, mud, a piece of plywood also works)

    Dunnage, 2×4, 4×4 blocks

    Good length of chain, sometimes you just can’t beat a good chain to make your recovery situation easier. Your tree strap or winch line might just be a bit too short. Chain is good for those situations where you need to adjust the length, NOT good for jerking like a snatch strap.

    Come a long…. I have used a winch in tandem with a come a  long to keep a rig from rolling off a really steep off camber trail. One of those situations where we could not go forward and had to back out, it had just started snowing the first time through, way worse on the way back. Also perfect for light weight rigs where winch mounting is not possible.

    Filters… Fuel, Air, and Oil… If one of those three is history you may be walking home, always good to have extras. You don’t need to buy the most expensive filters to keep in your rig as back ups, they only have to get you home.

    Fluids… Fuel, Oil, Water….

    Spare tire… it boggles my mind why someone would venture out with out one but it happens

    Patch kit… If you can’t have one, get the other and learn how to use it.

    Tools… Sometimes it is a matter of a loose bolt. I had an oil pressure regulator nut that kept backing out. On a powerstroke that’s not a good thing as the injectors are powered by oil pressure and fired electronically. Once oil pressure dropped to a certain point all it will do is turn over, it will never fire as there is zero fuel being injected. Not a good thing when you are miles from help. Good rule of thumb, when you work on your rig use the tools you carry with you so you know where everything is.

     

     

    #199732

    Morris Yarnell
    Participant
    Basic Member

    I have often thought that a reasonable amount of sockets or wrenches, would be enough to carry. Why carry a full set of sockets when there are only four or five of them that can be used on your vehicle? Unless of course you carry them to be a roadside mechanic for the ones that forget to carry anything.
    I am compiling a list of items to carry as spares, you list is adding to my list. The oil filter seems excessive as changing the oil in the vehicle should be a periodic maintenance item that may last 3 to 5 thousand miles depending on the vehicle. Changing oil in the sticks leads to pollution of the environment. I do carry extra oil though.
    Not sure about dunnage, what’s that?
    Also a small handsaw or similar would be an additional item to have.

    #199733

    Phil Fisk
    Participant
    Basic Member

    Consider adding;

    Serpentine belt

    Sections of heater hose and fuel line hose

    Spare radiator hoses if  your rig is more than 10yrs old and you haven’t recently changed them

    I also carry jumper cables and arc welding rods a small dremmel tool

    Spare U joints and Ujoint press

    Ratchet straps

    Occasionally I throw a vise in the rig that;s mounted on a piece of 2×2 and fits in any towing receiver.

     

     

     

    Oh, and a chair so I can sit and watch others use my tools to fix their rig 🙂

    #199734

    Patrick Tingley
    Participant
    Basic Member

    Morris the spare oil filter isn’t to change the oil, it’s in case a stick or something decides to puncture it.

    Dunnage is blocks of wood, something stable to set your jack on. A small section of 2×4 can also be used in the loops when connecting two snatch straps so they don’t lock together.

    I should get a  U joint press. Phil I carry all that other stuff though…. Except I have a wire feed…

    #199735

    Morris Yarnell
    Participant
    Basic Member

    Patrick,
    Thanks for the clarification on dunnage. I did look it up.

    My Rover has a huge steel plate bolted to the frame that protects the filter and the other stuff underneath. Have to take it off whenever I change oil, it’s very heavy.

    I also have a serpentine belt as a spare. Jumper cables (for other vehicles) thinking of not carrying them as I carry a Micro start that I keep charged. Spare wiper blades (knocked one off in a heavy snow storm near GC once, on another vehicle) so not going to be with out them.
    I also have recovery gear as well (start of this thread) winch, tow strap, tree strap, soft and hard shackles, HiLift and plate, ropes, but no chain. Do have snow chains, I am in Colorado after all.

    I have a chair too. Like to watch my tools in action.

    Thinking of the hoses as the next bit of kit to have on hand. Just had water pump replaced about 30K ago along with thermostat. Also have a dual battery set up with 100W solar panel back up for the fridge. Got to keep the beer cold while all these repairs are going on.

    The thing that is a real issue for me is all the electronics that make a Rover work, can be an issue some day.

    #199736

    Aaron Kravik
    Moderator
    Moderator

    I also carry a come along and have had to use it in a similar situation as Patrick described. I carry small blocks of 2×6 that are beveled that I use for leveling when parked that can be a platform for jacking or other things.

    One thing I recently added was wheel chocks. I see it all the time when someone is winching someone else that they put their vehicle in park. Bad juju! The parking palls aren’t that strong and some day it’s going to fail. I always put my truck in neutral with the parking brake set but sometimes just braking the rear wheels isn’t enough. Enter wheel chocks.

    #199737

    Morris Yarnell
    Participant
    Basic Member

    What are the chocks made of? I have some yellow plastic ones like those used with an RV. I think chocks should be made to fit the tire diameter and curve.

    #199744

    Aaron Kravik
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Mine are probably the same plastic ones you are describing.

    I agree about matching the arc of the tire but I think these will suffice

    #199746

    Benny Benson
    Moderator
    Area Coordinator

    May not really need it when offroading with folks that have rated recovery points, but a “transit cluster” is another item I’ve added to my winch bag. Comes in handy when you find rouge miatas out in the woods..

    #199748

    Aaron Kravik
    Moderator
    Moderator

    What’s a transit cluster?

    #199749

    Aaron Kravik
    Moderator
    Moderator

    Never mind I used the power of the interwebz to figure it out. I should get one of those

    #199753

    Britzen Roen
    Participant
    Basic Member

    We’re in heavy recovery season right now up here, averaging 2-3 a week on our mountain road up to the cabin. While not tools, per se, I’d add about three pairs of those nitrile dipped work gloves, a gallon of de-icer or some vodka, and a closed cell foam pad. I keep these in all the rigs, overland or not.  Those gloves really help keep dexterity when things are iced over. Had to rig up a recovery system on my grocery-getter Escape ( of course I wasn’t driving one of the Jeeps ) to recover a Tundra last week, the pad was nice to keep “town clothes” dry.

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