Sleeping systems?

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This topic contains 12 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Guy Miner 1 week ago.

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  • #192562

    Steve Bailey
    Participant
    Premium Member

    So I’m kind of curious what kind of sleeping systems you guys are use in your rooftop tent? Right now I’m using a sleeping bag from Cabela’s -20°. I know it also depends on the time of year what you bring so let’s just talk about winter for now.

    #192566

    Michael Winn
    Participant
    Basic Member

    I got this Teton -20 degree double bag and I love it!

    http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/sportsmans/TETON-Sports-Mammoth-Queen-Size-Sleeping-Bags/productDetail/Rectangular-Sleeping-Bags/prod9999008373/cat100842

    I ordered it from Amazon, but about the same price.  i cant sleep on slick nylon,this is a plush flannel material on the inside.  You’ll never get cold, in fact my side is usually unzipped and my lovely (cold blooded) wife never complains!

     

     

    #192610

    Christopher & Amy Naegele
    Participant
    Premium Member

    We purchased the same Teton Double and it works great for the colder times of the year.

    When it is warmer we use a primaloft blanket.

    With the big double bag it is too bulky to leave in the tent when folding it up so we use a huge compression sack.

    #192809

    Guy Miner
    Participant
    Area Coordinator

    My tent – she is not on my roof! 🙂

    Two backpacker’s foam sleeping pads on the tent floor. A large, old, rectangular synthetic-fill North Face sleeping bag. Sometimes an equally old down filled mummy bag instead. Go to bed warm, not cold if possible, and well fed with a good meal. Toss a small handwarmer inside the sleeping bag a bit before turning in. Wear a cap. Sleep well.

    Guy

    #192816

    Morris Yarnell
    Participant
    Basic Member

    Always wear a skull cap when sleeping out. It keeps me much warmer as my head is always out of the bag, tried sleeping inside it but felt a bit claustrophobic in there. Helps if it is a bit bigger to pull it over my eyes in the morning to keep the sun at bay just a bit longer, still too cold to get up that early.

    #192841

    Defenders NW
    Participant
    Vendor

    Flannel sheets, a couple wool Pendleton blankets and a down comforter…

    Wear a hat and socks when it’s cold enough

     

    #193706

    Steve Bailey
    Participant
    Premium Member

    Thank you all for the input. Here is what I went with a: Marmot Sawtooth Down Sleeping Bag and the Sea to Summit Thermolite Reactor Extreme Mummy Bag Liner. Wearing a sleeping cap was a really good idea (thanks Morris). The reason I went with two separate layers was so that I could adjust as the temperature changed. All in all I stayed nice and warm in low temps like 6 deg..

    #193707

    Otis Ranhofer
    Participant
    Premium Member

    We also layer our bags.
    For three seasons North Face Chrysalis +15 bag – really versatile as two bags can be zipped together. Also the 600-fill goose down is in continuous baffles let you position the down where you need it like all on the bottom for warm days.
    For real cold we have a bag from Feathered Friends which has a built in tube for a Thermorest air mattress. http://featheredfriends.com
    Put the North Face inside the Feathered Friends, you are good in Arctic conditions where we have used them.

    #193789

    Morris Yarnell
    Participant
    Basic Member

    Steve, That looks to be serious snow camping (from my vantage point, here in my warm house) and the RTT must get a bit of condensation doing that. I tried a RTT tent in the snow once, icicles from the ceiling. Not good.

    I looked at the bag you mentioned but do not do well with a mummy bag, need room to move. It is that claustrophobic thing again.  It does seem you are going into the wild very prepared. Enjoy

    I have taken to sleeping in the Rover in conditions like that. Even the OZ tent is not the best for snow like we have here in CO.

    #197650

    Steve Bailey
    Participant
    Premium Member

    So here is some of my knowledge that I have picked over the years snowshoe backpacking and now combining it with my love for Overlanding.  First thanks again for all the responses. I stated this post because I was wondering if there was any changes to my sleeping gear that I would make now that weight was not as much of a factor.

    So anyways,  let me comment on a few of the posts.  As far as my RTT in the cold cold, I have not experienced any difficulties with condensation inside that is to say that even though there is condensation is has not been a factor as weather it freezes or drip down the sides.  The Summit series CVT has a 1″ condensation mat under the 4″ sleeping mattress that keeps anything going down the side form effecting the function or comfort. Any freezing condensation is just that froze and sticks to the inside of the RTT and delt with as it thaws. Yes if it thaws while the RTT is stowed it will get on the mattress, but it is usually very minimal and at the first sunshine deploy evaporates quickly.

    Now onto keeping warm and why I chose what I did. Personally I love wool and do keep two wool blankets ready in the bottom of my dry bag. That said wool can get moldy if you are halving to pack it up daily damp. Synthetics are more resilient to mold and can be put away damp and the insides stay dry where wool is damp through and through and not very fun crawling into when its cold and stiff from freezing in the back of your rig.  Mummy bags are an exact science, here is what I mean.  To big and you loose, if you have to much space between your skin and the fill it takes longer and more human BTU’s to heat. To small and…well its just that to small its uncomfortable. It needs to be the right size and form to be effective when you need it to be. Form is very key as we are not all the same form from head to toe. You should find a store that will give you the opportunity to try on you bag and check the form.  Are they restrictive?  Yes to some degree they are but for a reason, they need to be able to trap the warm air at the right spots through the length of your body so that your body has the warm air up close to your skin and therefor minimal movement is allowed.  When it is -10 I just want to be warm and warm now!  Moving on, another advantage of this system is it is “high speed low drag”. I am saying that it stows quickly and deploys even faster.  When it is snowing out, wind blowing and you just want to go snuggle in, time is a factor after all the other things that you do when making camp for the night.

    The Sea to Summit Thermolite Reactor Extreme Mummy Bag Liner is magical like unicorns. It takes your already -0 bag and transforms it into a cuddly flannel like mummy bag with the added -10 or -15.  In some ways its very difficult to explain unless you try it. The liner with some kind of skull cap and properly zipping up your bag will give you a very warm and comfortable night sleep day in and day out with the coldest of seasons. Let me add that with this system I can accommodate any temperature including summer as I can strip it down to just the liner if need be.

    On a final note after putting this equipment though multiple trips this past winter to eastern Oregon and Sierras of Cal. I have found that many of the same gears that I have come to use while snowshoe backpacking prove to be very accommodating in Overlanding.  I hope you find this review useful and find your experience just as staffing…..Happy trails.

     

    #197977

    Guy Miner
    Participant
    Area Coordinator

    Thanks! Yes, I’ve been winter backpacking/camping since the 1970’s and don’t keep up on the latest gear real well.

    This year, I was headed to Alaska in May, to the Arctic for a nine-day grizzly hunt. I knew I’d be staying in a small backpacking tent for at least three weeks, for the trip up and back and the hunt… Took a hard look at my old sleeping bags. Went straight to the local backpacking store and helped myself to a nice synthetic North Face “snow leopard” bag, rated to either zero or 20 degrees depending on what ya read. Also got a nice inflatable Thermarest backpacking pad. I slept warm as could be in temps down to 20 or so, night after night. Nothing real cold, but, cold enough. That bag is excellent, and a real bargain. I think I paid about $160 for it.

    Guy

    #200217

    Mark Lennox
    Participant
    Basic Member

    For the 3 season camping my wife and I do when we are alone  or with close friends. Its the 4 piece sleep system from the good old US army! Gore tex bivy cover with two inner bags. They can be used all together or broken down depending on weather. We have quality cotts with a thermarest base camp pad and a closed cell foam pad under it. No tent, if  it rains, then a  small tarp. If around people we dont know we use our pine view easy up 8X14 tent. when we go to the ralley we will probably use our zip together outfitter type rectangular bags on a double tall queen air matt. Winter snow camping time<<<<<<<< well, thats cuddle up to the pellet stove time with a good cup of coffee! lol

    Guy Minor< I’m too old and crippled up to camp in the snow like that! You gotta be tough! lol I’m looking forward to meeting you at the ralley or sooner on the trail. It seems we have a lot in common.

    #200598

    Guy Miner
    Participant
    Area Coordinator

    Guy Minor< I’m too old and crippled up to camp in the snow like that! You gotta be tough! lol I’m looking forward to meeting you at the ralley or sooner on the trail. It seems we have a lot in common.

    See you at the Rally, if not before!

    At the rally, it’s often warm, or even hot. In 2015, we were sitting around in 106 degree temps… At night I just lay down atop my sleeping bag and slept just fine. It never did get very cool at night during that Northwest Overland Rally.

    Not tough, I just enjoy camping light. My buddy Rich Cronin is a fair number of years older than me (80 I think) and he still just sets up a little backpacking tent & crawls into it every night on our trips. He might be pretty tough! 🙂

    Regards, Guy

     

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